September 3, 2020, 01.15 AM

JAKARTA, KOMPAS.com – The Indonesian government plans to reduce the use of low octane fuel types that are not environmentally friendly in a bid to cut gas emissions from motor vehicles.

The initiative is in line with Environment and Forestry Ministry (LHK) Regulation No. 20/2017 on motor vehicle emission limits.

Minister of Energy and Mineral Resources Arifin Tasrif said that cuts in the use of polluting fuels would be carried out in stages.

The government will encourage consumers to switch from 88 octane fuel or locally known as Premium to 90 octane fuel or Pertalite.

Also read: Indonesia’s Pertamina Ready to Scrap Low Octane Fuels Production

“One of the programs is to replace premium fuel with Pertalite. This aims to cut the pollution problems,” said Arifin during a hearing with House of Representatives Commission VII lawmakers overseeing energy on September 2.

Arifin said only five countries still use the low octane fuel.

Indonesia is one of the big countries that are still using it.” 

He went on to say that together with the Indonesian state energy company PT Pertamina (Persero), his office would encourage the gradual transition from Premium usage to Pertalite in various regions.

He said that Bali is one of the areas where the transition program has been implemented by slashing the Pertalite price of 6,450 per litter or the equivalent of Premium. “In the future, this can also be implemented in Java, Madura, and Bali.” 

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